Dizzying, Dazzling Disney World

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My great niece with Cinderella in her castle. This was one of the happier moments of the trip.

I’ve just returned from nearly a week at Disney World. Four generations of our family converged in central Florida from Louisiana, Texas and Georgia. Our gang ranged in age from 86 to 5 years old.

From the moment I landed at the Orlando Airport, I was greeted by smiling, cheerful people eager to make my stay memorable. We were whisked off to our lodgings in buses with cheerful Christmas tunes over the loudspeakers driven by an incredibly effervescent driver. The place we stayed in was supposed to resemble Key West. I’ve never been to Key West, Florida, but the plantation style shutters on faux clapboard units were in place to evoke the southernmost Floridian vibe.

I have visited the Magic Kingdom before, once as a child, and twice as a young adult. The constellation of different resorts entertains on all levels. There are shows, rides, parades, concerts, gondola rides, boat rides, a monorail and a plethora of eating establishments.

I tried to participate as much as possible in the vast array of attractions and distractions. I rode rides. I watched street exhibits of acrobats, dancers and Disney characters. I ate and drank too well and too often.

I enjoyed the Magic Kingdom for sentimental reasons, seeing quintessential sights I remembered from my childhood visit in the early 70s. I recalled with fondness the Hall of Presidents and the Haunted Mansion. The youngest in our group enjoyed the princess and fairy tale venues.

Epcot was more enjoyable for the older members in our group. During our stay, the Epcot International Food and Wine Festival was underway. Country upon country were represented by cultural exhibits, as well as food and beverages from each nation. I enjoyed the French architecture and food. Mexico had a good gig, too, even if the Mayan ruins were a bit too fake and shiny.

The essence of Disney seems to be to make one excitably happy. For me, Disney was an exercise in flights of fantasy, surreal and strange scenes, bemusing and bewildering at times. There was almost a manic pace to the crowds searching for the next exciting moment.

Disney is an American spectacle to be sure. Thomas Jefferson famously wrote about the American right to the pursuit happiness, but happiness is an elusive goal. For me, all that work to be happy was a tad exhausting.

Who Dat? and Tigers

I am a Who Dat.

My sister is a LSU Tigers fan.Who dat

We live in different cities. We have different allegiances. In New Orleans we live and breathe the Saints during football season. We bleed black and gold. We like our chant, Who Dat? when cheering for the team.

In Baton Rouge, my sister revels in Louisiana State University football. In Baton Rouge, the locals wear purple and gold on Saturday afternoons during pilgrimages to Death Valley, the locals’ name for the stadium. My sister has elaborate tail-gate parties featuring all manner of Southern food in the parking lot before the game. 

fleur de lisI usually watch the New Orleans Saints on television on Sunday afternoon.  My pre-game ritual is a Popeyes combo meal of fried chicken, fries and a biscuit. I wear my blackshirt with a gold fleur-de-lis. The fleur-de-lis is the symbol of New Orleans. 

The two cities, Baton Rouge and New Orleans, are only about an hour apart. Our games are only a day apart. But the cultural difference is huge. We speak differently.

In New Orleans, I chant, “Who dat say they gonna beat ‘dem Saints!

In Baton Rouge, my sister just says, “Go Tigers!”LSU

This year, both teams are winning. The Saints are 6-1. The Tigers are 7-0.

Long live the Who Dat Nation and the purple and gold Tigers. This is the South, and we sisters love our football.

 

Shorts

No, I am not wearing short pants. It’s unseasonably cold in Louisiana. We’re having days  upon days of subfreezing night temperatures. I am speaking of short bits of information that I will write about in this space.

  • I finished a Shutterfly book this week about my father’s family. I wrote about my family’s arrival to the New World in the early 1700s to the present. Lots of pictures of my modern ancestors kept it fresh.  I will try to flesh out a few stories into blog-worthy posts in the next several weeks. Especially intriguing are the stories about my ancestor whose first name was a derivative of the word, Bear. Ursin, from the Latin, Ursa, was bearish in his pursuits, accomplishments and appetites.
  • Since the weather has been unseasonably cold, I took the opportunity to read a bit. Three books captivated my interest.
  • White Like Her: My Family’s Story of Race and Racial Passing by Gail Lukasik is not the best-written book. However the subject was intriguing and it was well-researched. The story is about a woman who left New Orleans with a black identity and white skin, married into a white family, and forever left her black roots behind. At least she did until she died. Her daughter tells an intriguing story of New Orleans society, where the one-drop rule kept otherwise white-looking people forever in the colored/black social class. Thanks, Carol King, for the tip on a good read.
  • The Girl with Seven Names: Escape from North Korea by Hyeonseo Lee and David John was a gripping tale of a girl who, at first, left North Korea for a few days lark, but could never return. Her story makes one wish fervently for the overthrow of the North Korean regime. Thanks for the suggestion, Michael Dickson. 
  • You Were Born For This: 7 Keys to a life of Predictable Miracles by Bruce Wilkinson and David Kopp is a book I haven’t completed yet. The premise is that we all experience nudges from God to do sometimes simple things that have great impact. Here’s an excerpt:

    We’re never more fully alive and complete than when we experience God working through us and in spite of us in a way that changes someone’s life right before our eyes Nothing compares to the wonder of seeing God’s goodness and glory break through – and knowing we played a part in it. p 26

That’s a wrap for this post. Stay warm. And don’t forget to wait on God for nudges to bring forth a miracle in someone’s life.

Caution: Be Alert, Shelter in Place

word cloudI confess. Somewhat shamefacedly, I confess to clicking on Facebook quizzes. However, I don’t publish the results. I have my standards. Just look, don’t publish.  This quiz, the word cloud, supposedly captures my most used words on Facebook.

As anyone can see, Honduras is smack dab in the middle. It’s definitely in the middle of my thoughts the past few days. I bought my airline ticket last week for a trip to Honduras to begin in the middle of January and end on Fat Tuesday.

It’s almost certain there will be civil disturbances in Honduras when I travel there. The presidential election results are being disputed by the opposition party. There have been massive protests. The OAS (Organization of American States) has called for a new election due to obvious voting and ballot counting irregularities resulting in the incumbent declaring himself a dubious winner of the vote.

This is the warning from the US State Department affecting the city where I will fly to, although it’s not where I plan on staying. It urges citizens to postpone or cancel unnecessary travel to mainland Honduras. I am going to give this serious thought today.

Security Message for U.S. Citizens: Cortes Department: Shelter in Place

As result of escalating protests and violence relating to an election dispute, the U.S. Embassy has ordered its personnel in the Honduran Department of Cortes (including the city of San Pedro Sula) to shelter in place until further notice. U.S. citizen visitors and residents are encouraged to take similar precautions.

U.S. Citizens who plan to travel to Honduras or are currently in Honduras should review the Honduras Travel Alert, issued on December 6th which urges U.S. Citizens to postpone or cancel unnecessary travel to mainland Honduras.

Little House in the Big Woods

I live nearly equidistant between Abita Roasting  Company and Abita Brewing. I like having options when it comes to beverages. Neither of these fine establishments are within the tiny confines of the city limits of Abita Springs. And neither am I.

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This was summer. Now most of the yard is covered in leaves. Grab a rake and drop in someday. 

I live here, in this tiny cottage on the edge of a densely wooded thicket. On one side on this country lane, I have one neighbor. The other, the almost impenetrable forest. I like my neighbors: a fine family next door of immigrants, and the other side is a thicket, home to rabbits, raccoons, squirrels,  and the like. I believe in diversity. I am the only white mammal in the bunch. 

Drop by sometime, but call first. The GPS will lead you to a house further in the dense wood, by a road best not travelled by most of us. In fact, I am too scared or too smart to not pass close to the dwelling that most GPS trackers label as my home. Even the UPS driver won’t deliver to that address that the trackers point as my dwelling. I am fairly confident I can enjoy my Sunday afternoon nap without any of you dropping by. You cannot find me and that’s fine with me.

 

A Floyd Is Born

This is the first installment of an occasional series about my father and his forebears.

FLoyd 39-40 age 7_8
My father is about 7 years old in this picture. The shirt isn’t dirty. It’s a thumbprint from God knows when.

On December 24, 1932, a boy was born. His mother was 40, and his father 45. He would be the youngest of eight children. It may have been a starry night, and perhaps some of the family had attended church services that featured a Christmas carol or two, maybe even the one about the star that guided wise men to Jesus. The family had little resources or time to celebrate the birth of Jesus, as my dad was making his way into the world that day on one of the holiest nights of the year  in the midst of the greatest economic downturns the nation had seen or would ever see again. That boy would grow up to be my father.

His parents’ called him Harold. His sister preferred his middle name, Floyd. She thought perhaps the name Floyd was pretty and infamous, like the bank robber/Robin Hood folk hero of the same name. The name stuck. He would always be known as Floyd, not Harold

I am fairly certain that my grandmother and namesake, Laurentine, was not interested in another child. She had six other sons, and as well as one daughter. She had named the seventh child born a few years before after her husband. No other Junior had been planned. The couple would have no more children after Floyd, my dad, was birthed. 

Floyd, the pretty boy, would grow and become in many ways the elder of his seven siblings. That’s a story for another day.

FJ Kenneth Floyd
Dad is far right. Also pictured is his older brother and another relative. His brother is holding a pet rabbit.

The Matherne family was like many families in the 1930s. Strapped for cash, my grandfather sold some  farmland. His second to youngest nearly died of typhoid. Floyd, my father, escaped unscathed from disease during those lean years. His memories of his early years were happy ones. 

One of his favorite stories took place with the boys in the picture on the side of this post. He and his brother were playing in the family barn, and somehow, the littlest, a nephew, was left tied in in the loft for most of the day, His mom went looking for him at dusk, only to find him hanging from a rafter. No one was hurt, although Floyd and his brother probably earned a switching behind the woodshed for that prank.

Pretty boy Floyd, that is my father, not the outlaw, had many adventures as did his forebears. We’ll pick up later with some of those tales. For now, we leave Floyd in his youth, having fun in bayou country.

 

Writing Without Periods

I can write without periods I am confident about this statement This is a moment I have longed for It’s not a disease at all It’s a blessing! There comes that moment in a woman’s life when she realizes true freedom This is it gals and guys who follow the Gumbo YaYa I am a happy liberated woman at last

For my reader’s sake I will resume putting proper punctuation in further postings even though I am free now from that infernal mark of womankind Even better I am not balancehormoneshaving hot flashes.

As Martin Luther King, Jr, said “Free at last! Good God almighty, we are free at last!”

Freedom from a 28 day hormonal cycle is indeed worthy of celebration although I wish I were free from other things too I would love to be writing without 60 pounds of extra weight  It would be nice to write without fear and without shame, something the human condition so easily accepts as normal Fortoday I am free to write without periods which is something that makes me happy

It’s a freedom only women can understand I feel like Helen Reddy, a singer that the young’uns among us cannot appreciate I will end this post with her song I Am Woman

Stay tuned!

The YaYa girl has lots of gumbo stories to serve with punctation and even periods as needed.